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The surge of interest in fake news in the last decade has prompted an outpouring of research on how the American public interacts with misinformation. This list of suggested resources will appeal to academics, to high school and undergraduate students seeking better methods for engaging with the news, and to general readers.

Together, they provide a well-rounded overview of the role of misinformation through history and what readers can do about it today.

A massive shift in the way the public consumes news media has been underway for years, but was a watershed moment. To this day, consumers of news continue to grapple with questions about truth and facts, science and politics. There are dozens of titles published in the last five years alone that discuss how to identify false information and potential solutions to the problem. These books are written by academics, professionals, journalists, teachers, and librarians.

There are several challenges for librarians interested in building a collection of resources about fake news, misinformation, and conspiracy theories. The first is the lack of diversity among writers publishing on this topic. White and male authors are overrepresented, and the majority of English-language misinformation resources focus heavily on the United States and Europe.

Also, because this topic is so politically charged, some titles appear nonpartisan but, in reality, promote political agendas. This list of suggested resources focuses on titles that, while having a point of view and advocating for their position, are grounded in research and reason. There are options to appeal to academics, to high school and undergraduate students seeking better methods for engaging with the news, and to general readers.

Starred titles are recommended for all library collections. Berman, Jonathan M. ISBN A comprehensive, factual account of the history of vaccine development, deployment, and opposition. Written before the COVID pandemic, this volume provides context for present-day issues and a good account of how vaccine misinformation has developed over time.

Cortada, James W. An in-depth exploration of how fake news has impacted American politics since its founding. The volume uses a few key examples of misinformation campaigns, such as those of tobacco companies, to analyze the ways that lies and conspiracy theories have shaped collective understanding of the truth. Higdon, Nolan. Conducts an analysis of fake news through a critical media literacy framework. Subjects include political party- and state-sponsored propaganda, the positioning of fake news in the journalism ecosystem, and strategies for identifying and combating fake news.

Hochschild, Jennifer L. Do Facts Matter? Information and Misinformation in American Politics Vol. Drawing on such relevant examples as climate change, vaccines, and the Affordable Care Act, the authors examine the extent to which misinformation affects political and personal decision-making among voters and lawmakers.

A narrow focus allows for a deep dive into this issue, with analysis on how characteristics such as race, age, gender, and education levels affect responses to misinformation. McBrayer, Justin P. Considers both societal and individual imperatives for improving the information environment and explores modern understandings of trust, expertise, and truth.

Misinformation and Mass Audiences. Southwell, Emily A. A volume of essays that addresses the effects of misinformation on society. First, it discusses how people research and conceptualize misinformation.

Later, it delves into the impact and potential solutions. Essays are best suited to an academic audience and intersect with such disciplines as politics, environmentalism, news, satire, marketing, and public health.

New York Times Editorial Staff. NYT Edu. This is a series of short vignettes written by New York Times staff, who identify people and issues associated with contemporary fake news in the U. The people who create it, the proposals to combat it, and its role in the Trump administration are among the topics.

One section addresses the international impact of fake news. Yale Univ. This work captures the complexity of misinformation by applying research models that consider how people interact with one another, what their motivations are for creating and spreading falsehoods, and how the public responds to these instances.

Best suited for academic audiences. Turner, Patricia A. A historical overview of how rumor and misinformation affect Black communities. Topics addressed include the Ku Klux Klan and the FBI and how their legacies continue to impact information-sharing and belief systems. This also explores how rumor has served as a method of resistance to racism and violence. Young, Kevin. Young provides a thorough examination of the American appetite for sensation and hoaxes, with a particular focus on the relationship between misinformation and racism.

Featuring a history not often found in other publications, this work zigzags across time to cover everything from spiritualism and P. Barnum to fake memoirs and journalist Stephen Glass. Barclay, Donald A. A librarian discusses why misinformation matters, how those who create and spread it trick news consumers, and how everyone can better guard themselves against poor information sources.

Takes an entertaining approach to information literacy instruction, with a number of clear examples and suggestions for analyzing content. Bartlett, Bruce. Ten Speed. A pocket-sized book offering useful, clear guidance to help readers understand how news and journalism work and how they can be responsible and savvy news consumers.

Discusses source types, how to use libraries and Wikipedia, and strategies commonly used by journalists. Bergstrom, Carl T. Inspired by their course at the University of Washington, the authors explore what misinformation is, how technology has amplified it, and how and why people use it. Collins, Loren. Bullspotting: Finding Facts in the Age of Misinformation.

Collins investigates the methods used by conspiracy theorists, such as Holocaust deniers, truthers, and birthers to spread their false beliefs. Highly accessible and engaging, this equips readers with the ability to recognize and counter tactics, such as fake experts, pseudoscience, to recognize and counter tactics, such as fake experts, pseudoscience, and logical fallacies.

Grant, John. Debunk It! With an emphasis on science and critical thinking, this work helps readers, especially teens and young adults, to better understand the consequences of misinformation and the methods people use to spread and defend it. Boldly confronts topics like evolution, religion, mysticism, alternative medicine, and vaccines and illustrates how misinformation caused harm to scientists and communities. Levitin, Daniel J. An easy-to-follow volume that offers accessible examples of how facts and numbers are manipulated to trick readers into believing misinformation.

Covers tactics commonly used by advertisers, journalists, businesses, and politicians to skew data and information in their favor and trains readers to be on guard. McAfee, David G. Journalist McAfee synthesizes research into a concise exploration of the 21st-century fake news landscape.

The author discusses technological, personal, and social strategies that can combat fake news and spotlights the financial incentives for creating it, as well as the consequences of allowing it to proliferate.

Affelt, Amy. This book explores research on how people interact with fake news on social media platforms. It also shares suggested resources and strategies for librarians and other educators. Libraries Unlimited. Though intended for librarians, the essays in this volume provide valuable perspectives on fake news and approaches to information literacy that are relevant and accessible to a range of educators and scholars.

IGI Global. This collection of academic essays is useful for those studying misinformation at the collegiate level, specifically librarians, educators, and those in the fields of communications and information science. Some essays propose methods of developing stronger information literacy skills at the individual level, while others consider how to counter misinformation in a societal context.

This well-organized volume defines fake news broadly and brings together essays on topics such as algorithms, memes, data visualizations, and pseudoscience. Each essay includes a suggested learning activity to teach digital awareness and media literacy.

Some are geared toward particular user groups, such as older adults or graduate students, while others are adaptable to a wider range of audiences and settings. Conspiracies and Conspiracy Theories in American History. An extensive two-volume encyclopedia of famous and enduring American conspiracy theories.

Each entry provides the facts of the situation, the elements of the conspiracy theory, how it developed, and its major adherents. The work also includes short introductory essays on the role of conspiracy theories in American science, business, military, politics, and pop culture. Oxford Univ. Featuring essays by researchers from politics, sociology, history, law, philosophy, and more, this collection asks how conspiracy theories manage to exist and thrive alongside religion, government, and science in the U.

Though academic in nature, many of the essays have a balanced, approachable tone. Merlan, Anna. This work details prominent American conspiracy theories from the perspective of a journalist who has spoken directly to the people responsible for spreading them. Through engaging storytelling, Merlan explores such conspiracies as the murder of Seth Rich and the link between vaccines and autism.

The author insightfully connects historical events to present-day issues and considers the racism, misogyny, and anti-Semitism prevalent in many conspiracy theory circles. Rothschild, Mike.

 

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A pocket-sized book offering useful, clear guidance to help readers understand how news and journalism work and how they can be responsible and savvy news consumers. Discusses source types, how to use libraries and Wikipedia, and strategies commonly used by journalists. Bergstrom, Carl T. Inspired by their course at the University of Washington, the authors explore what misinformation is, how technology has amplified it, and how and why people use it.

Collins, Loren. Bullspotting: Finding Facts in the Age of Misinformation. Collins investigates the methods used by conspiracy theorists, such as Holocaust deniers, truthers, and birthers to spread their false beliefs. Highly accessible and engaging, this equips readers with the ability to recognize and counter tactics, such as fake experts, pseudoscience, to recognize and counter tactics, such as fake experts, pseudoscience, and logical fallacies.

Grant, John. Debunk It! With an emphasis on science and critical thinking, this work helps readers, especially teens and young adults, to better understand the consequences of misinformation and the methods people use to spread and defend it. Boldly confronts topics like evolution, religion, mysticism, alternative medicine, and vaccines and illustrates how misinformation caused harm to scientists and communities.

Levitin, Daniel J. An easy-to-follow volume that offers accessible examples of how facts and numbers are manipulated to trick readers into believing misinformation. Covers tactics commonly used by advertisers, journalists, businesses, and politicians to skew data and information in their favor and trains readers to be on guard. McAfee, David G.

Journalist McAfee synthesizes research into a concise exploration of the 21st-century fake news landscape. The author discusses technological, personal, and social strategies that can combat fake news and spotlights the financial incentives for creating it, as well as the consequences of allowing it to proliferate.

Affelt, Amy. This book explores research on how people interact with fake news on social media platforms. It also shares suggested resources and strategies for librarians and other educators. Libraries Unlimited. Though intended for librarians, the essays in this volume provide valuable perspectives on fake news and approaches to information literacy that are relevant and accessible to a range of educators and scholars.

IGI Global. This collection of academic essays is useful for those studying misinformation at the collegiate level, specifically librarians, educators, and those in the fields of communications and information science. Some essays propose methods of developing stronger information literacy skills at the individual level, while others consider how to counter misinformation in a societal context. This well-organized volume defines fake news broadly and brings together essays on topics such as algorithms, memes, data visualizations, and pseudoscience.

Each essay includes a suggested learning activity to teach digital awareness and media literacy. Some are geared toward particular user groups, such as older adults or graduate students, while others are adaptable to a wider range of audiences and settings. Conspiracies and Conspiracy Theories in American History. An extensive two-volume encyclopedia of famous and enduring American conspiracy theories. Each entry provides the facts of the situation, the elements of the conspiracy theory, how it developed, and its major adherents.

The work also includes short introductory essays on the role of conspiracy theories in American science, business, military, politics, and pop culture.

Oxford Univ. Featuring essays by researchers from politics, sociology, history, law, philosophy, and more, this collection asks how conspiracy theories manage to exist and thrive alongside religion, government, and science in the U. Though academic in nature, many of the essays have a balanced, approachable tone. Merlan, Anna. This work details prominent American conspiracy theories from the perspective of a journalist who has spoken directly to the people responsible for spreading them.

Through engaging storytelling, Merlan explores such conspiracies as the murder of Seth Rich and the link between vaccines and autism. The author insightfully connects historical events to present-day issues and considers the racism, misogyny, and anti-Semitism prevalent in many conspiracy theory circles. Rothschild, Mike. Melville House.

Rothschild offers a well-organized, compelling examination of QAnon, from its inception through its role in the U. Capitol insurrection.

This will help readers with little knowledge of the QAnon conspiracy understand how it came to be, the historical background on which it builds, and its consequences for the U. Uscinski, Joseph E. Conspiracy Theories: A Primer. A straightforward introduction to conspiracy theories, primarily in the U. Explores the definitions of conspiracy theories, their popularity and history, and how sociological, psychological, and political factors influence belief in conspiracy theories.

The final chapter discusses how the election of Donald Trump put a spotlight on conspiracy theories. Van Prooijen, Jan-Willem. The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories. Walker, Jesse. A thorough exploration of how conspiracy theories have shaped the U. Walker combines political and historical analysis with pop culture and religion to illustrate how pervasive and multifaceted many conspiracy theories in American history have been and how influential they continue to be on law and life today.

West, Mick. Written by a conspiracy theory expert with a great deal of empathy and knowledge, this work clearly explains how modern conspiracy theories develop, how people become believers, and how others can help conspiracy theorists recognize it. You did not sign in correctly or your account is temporarily disabled. Your password must include at least three of these elements: lower case letters, upper case letters, numbers, or special characters.

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